Germany: 17.12.2017, 12:49 | England: 17.12.2017, 11:49 | Barbados: 17.12.2017, 07:49

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All about Barbados

First inhabitants of Barbados were Arrawak- and Carib-Indians.
They lived from fishing, tobacco- and cottonwool planting. In such times they even had a calender system. In todays time archeologists found proofs like pottery in Chancery Lane, Pie Corner, Mapps Cave, Stroud Point and Silver Sands. The island was discovered by portugese sailors on the way to Brasil in 1536. They arrived at todays Holetown and baptised the island "Los Barbados" because the air roots of the trees reminded them of beards.
It still is a riddle today where the indians stayed because no one was left when the english landed on Barbados in 1625. Instead they were welcomed by a number of wild pigs. A guess is they got sold as slaves another guess is they all got killed by an epidemic.
The first english settler was Capt. John Powell, he is pictured on a stamp.
The original name of the island was allegedly 'Ichirouganaim'.
The dutch played an important role in the history of Barbados. Dutch jews brought sugar cane to the island in the 17th century. They tought the english how to use sugar cane and established the first windmills. The english needed people to work for the sugar cane industry so they kidnapped slaves from africa.
The language reminds still today of the indian language once used, 'hurricane' meant 'aruak huracan' or 'canoe' meant 'canaua'.
The white english, scottish, irish and welsh, who were banned to Barbados, received nicknames like 'Red Legs' or 'Ecky Becky' or 'Poor backra-johnnies' because they were poor or their legs got badly sunburned. Of course this changed with the time, even the black famous politician Grantley Adams, who achieved great progress for the island (the airport was named after him), married into a white family in the twenties.
In 1834 slavery got banned officially and 1966 Barbados received independency.
Stagfield House 6th Ave. North Drive, Lot 171 Heywoods Park, St. Peter, Barbados W.I.
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